You and Your Dog: 10 Astonishing Bonds that You Share with Your Pet

The connection between humans and canines goes back a long way and has evolved over time. Here are ways how both species have contributed immensely to each others growth and well being.

1. Increased immunity and reduced allergies

Sharing your home with a furry pet, dogs in particular, has been known to increase immunity against allergies, asthma, etc. in infants and children. Even when a pregnant woman lives with a dog, it is said that her child is less likely to develop allergies. A study published in 2004 by The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology states that children in the presence of dogs, particularly so around the time they are born, experience heightened immune development and reduced vulnerability to certain allergies.

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Scientists don’t know why, but it may be due to an immune system boost at a critical stage in our development by the bacteria on dog’s bodies.

2. Less stress

Living with your fur buddy can do amazingly positive things to your mood and stress factors. This is more so in an emergency, at work or during a crisis. The International Journal of Workplace Health Management states in a 2012 study that dogs in the workplace help reduce stress and increase job satisfaction. Especially for dog owners, who tend to take more breaks and get energized when they resume work.

3. Happy heart, healthy heart

Hanging out with your furry friend not only reduces stress, but also reduces cholesterol, triglyceride levels and blood pressure. Resulting in fewer heart attacks and better cardiovascular health. Dog owners have better survival rates even after a heart attack. Just pet your pet for that feel good feeling!

4. Get physical!

Dogs love exercise and going for walks. The American Journal of Preventative Medicine states in a 2006 study that dog owners are more active than non-dog owners. The latter walk an average of 168 minutes a week compared to 300 minutes of walking by dog owners, who are less stressed and have healthier hearts.

5. Cheer up!

Having a dog helps in reducing loneliness and depression according to a University of Portsmouth study in 2006. Dog walkers claim to feel happier when meeting people during walks.

6. Linguistic skills

A 2016 study in Hungary suggests a similarity in the way humans and dogs process language. Dogs know the difference between significant and insignificant words, as well as positive tones and words. They can basically figure us out.

7. Feel the empathy

The Hungarian experiment also suggests that dogs can recognize and respond to our emotions by tapping into the part of their brains that deal with expressions, communications and memories.

8. Craving praise

Dogs really care about what we think of them. An Emory University research project found that dogs prefer praise to treats.

9. Comfort and companionship

Thanks to domestication, dogs have lost their edge compared to their wolf ancestors. They hear and smell less, but are better at coexisting with humans.

10. It’s in the genes

It has been found that genetic mutations in sociable pet dogs make them more open to humans, and enable bonding. Otherwise, we could not have domesticated them.

Bond with your bestie!

  • Talking
  • Spending time together
  • Work out together
  • Dog sports
  • Dog training
  • Games
  • Form a pet therapy team
  • Be attentive